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Workers’ Compensation

Have you been hurt at work? We are Oklahoma's largest worker's compensation law firm for employees that have been injured on the job. We only represent injured employees, NOT insurance companies or employers. If you're hurt, we can help.

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Social Security Disability

Has an injury or illness left you unable to work? Getting your social security disability income started is a serious matter. We have helped thousands of people across the country get their SSD benefits started, and we can do the same thing for you.

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Motor Vehicle Accident

Have you been hurt in a car, truck, or motorcycle accident? Motor vehicle accidents are very disruptive to your daily life. We can help you get the treatment you need and pursue the maximum compensation from your accident. Your first consultation is always free.

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Workers' Comp

Have you been hurt at work? We are Oklahoma's largest worker's compensation law firm for those that have been injured on the job. If you're hurt, we can help.

Social Security

Getting your social security disability income started is a serious matter. We have helped thousands of people nationwide get their SSD benefits started.

Auto Accidents

Have you been hurt in a car, truck, or motorcycle accident? We can help you get the treatment you need and pursue the maximum compensation from your accident.

Social Security FAQ

What is SSD?
Where Does The Money Come From?
How Do I Qualify For SSD?
How Long Do I Have to Apply?
When Should I Apply?
What is a “Disability”?
Can I Still Be Working and Apply?
How Long Will I Remain Insured?
How Do I Apply for SSD?
What Do I Do If I Am Denied?
What If The 60 Days Have Passed?
Do I Need An Attorney Yet?
What If I Am Denied Again?
What is The Biggest Mistake To Make?
Do I Have To Go To Court?
How Long Will It Take To Get My Benefits?
How Much Can I Draw If I Win?
How Often Will I Be Paid?
Are My Spouse and Children Covered?
How Far Back Will I Be Paid?
How Long Will I Draw SSD?
Will My Case Be Reviewed?
Will I Need An Attorney For The Review?
Will This Affect My Old Age Social Security?
Does My Disability Have To Be Caused By An Accident?
Does Alcoholism Or Drug Addiction Qualify?
Can I Draw Both SSD and Workers’ Compensation?
Can My Disabled Child Qualify For SSD Benefits?
Will I Be Entitled to Medicare Or Medicade?
What is SSI?
How Do You Qualify For SSI?
How Do I Apply For SSI?
Does It Take As Long As SSD?
Will I Still Need To Appeal The First Denial
Will I Have To Go To Court?
How Long Does It Take To Receive Benefits?
How Much Will I Receive?
Why Would I Want SSI Benefits?
Can I Draw Both SSI and SSD?
Can My Disabled Child Draw SSI?
How Far Back Will I Be Paid?
Why Do I Need An Attorney For Either SSD or SSI Benefits?
How Much Does An Attorney Charge?
Are There Any Other Charges For Preparing My Case?
How Are These Charges Paid?
Where Can I Obtain Additional Information About Social Security Disability Or Supplemental Security Income Benefits?

What is SSD?

SSD is another name for Social Security Disability, and is the type of disability benefits most “disabled” individuals seek.  These benefits are paid out by the Social Security Administration.

Where Does The Money Come From?

SSD benefits are paid out of the funds you pay into Social Security during the years that you work.

How Do I Qualify For SSD?

The first requirement is that you must have paid into the Social Security Administration for a long enough period and in a large enough amount to be considered “Insured.”  Next, you must not be “gainfully” employed.  You must next be under a “disability” which has lasted or is expected to last 12 months.  You must next have a “disability” which is severe enough to keep you from doing your past job or any other jobs in the local or national economy.  All of the terms in quotations are legal terms which need to be explained by an attorney familiar with Social Security Regulations.

How Long Do I Have to Apply?

There is no set time limit in which to apply for benefits.  However, the longer you wait, the more benefits you may lose.  Also, since your insured status usually ends five years from the last date that you worked, should you wait longer than five years to apply for benefits, it may become extremely difficult or impossible to obtain benefits.

When Should I Apply?

As soon as you are told by a doctor that you will be unable to work for 12 months or more, or if you have already been unable to work for at least 12 months due to a medical disability.

What is a “Disability”?

This is a legal term used by the Social Security Administration.  In short, a disability could be any medically documented condition which keeps you from obtaining substantial gainful employment for at least 12 months.

Can I Still Be Working and Apply?

Yes.  As long as your wages do not exceed those set by the Social Security Administration.  Most people can still work and make up to $940.00 per month yet still be eligible for SSD benefits.

How Long Will I Remain Insured?

Normally, you keep your insured status for about five years from the date you last worked.

How Do I Apply for SSD?

The road to benefits is long.  We stand ready to help you from the beginning.  You will have to initiate the application at your Social Security Office, but we will be happy to help you with the forms and paperwork.  SSA will schedule an interview in person and may send you to their doctor for an evaluation.  This step will take about 90 days.

What Do I Do If I Am Denied?

Almost everyone who applied for SSD benefits is denied at this first stage.  You should contact an attorney to make a “Request for Reconsideration” within 60 days from the date of your denial letter.

What If The 60 Days Have Passed?

If you do not appeal within the 60 day period, you likely must start over and could lost benefits.

Do I Need An Attorney Yet?

Yes.  An experienced attorney will assure that your rights are protected.

What If I Am Denied Again?

Almost everyone is denied a second time, but we later win about 70% of our cases.

What is The Biggest Mistake To Make?

Failing to appeal in a timely manner.  More than two thirds of the people who are denied at the first step fail to request a reconsideration. Also, failing to keep in contact with your treating doctor and following his/her instructions can be damaging to your case.

Do I Have To Go To Court?

Yes.  Once you are denied at the Reconsideration stage and you contact an attorney, your case will be appealed to an Administrative Law Judge and set for hearing. At this hearing, you will have to be present and testify regarding your medical problems. However, the trial process is very informal. It is only you, the Judge, a reporter, your attorney and maybe a vocational specialist in the room. There is no jury, and the hearing is not open to the public.

How Long Will It Take To Get My Benefits?

From the time you first apply for benefits until you have your hearing will normally be about 1 year.  It will then be another 2 to 4 months before the Judge decides if you will be granted benefits. It will then be another 60 days before you actually receive any money.

How Much Can I Draw If I Win?

This question can only be answered once an attorney has access to your social security records. The amount is dif¬ferent for every individual, depending on how much you pay into the system.

How Often Will I Be Paid?

You will receive an initial check representing your past due benefits in one lump sum. You will then receive a monthly check after that.

Are My Spouse and Children Covered?

Usually your children and your spouse will also be entitled to receive monthly checks while you are disabled. This is in addition to the money you receive each month.

How Far Back Will I Be Paid?

If you are granted benefits, you can be paid past due benefits which go back a maximum of one year from the date you apply for benefits. Your payments would start 5 months after the date your disability began.

How Long Will I Draw SSD?

You will continue to draw disability benefits as long as you remain disabled.

Will My Case Be Reviewed?

Yes.  Most SSD cases are reviewed every 3 years to determine if you are still disabled.

Will I Need An Attorney For The Review?

Normally, you will not require the assistance of an attorney when your case is reviewed, as long as you continue to follow-up with a doctor every so often.

Will This Affect My Old Age Social Security?

No. You will still be entitled to receive your old age Social Security Benefits. They may even be more.

Does My Disability Have To Be Caused By An Accident?

No. Your disability can be caused either by an accident, a birth defect, or a hereditary disease process such as Multiple Sclerosis, Cerebral Palsy, ALS, AIDS, or a number of other physical or mental conditions.

Does Alcoholism Or Drug Addiction Qualify?

No. In fact, if a drug or alcohol addiciton is considered a material contributing factor to your disability, you may be denied disability benefits.

Can I Draw Both SSD and Workers’ Compensation?

Absolutely.  You can draw SSD, SSI and Workers’ Compensation. Your SSD and/or SSI benefits will not affect your workers’ compensation benefits. The amount you receive from SSD or SSI may be reduced if you are receving, have received or may be receiving workers’ compensation benefits. You should discuss this with an attorney who is experienced with Social Security.

Can My Disabled Child Qualify For SSD Benefits?

Disabled children can only qualify for SSD benefits once they reach the age of 18. This is a very complex issue and needs to be discussed with an attorney.  However, see the discussion on SSI benefits.

Will I Be Entitled to Medicare Or Medicade?

Yes, SSI recipients become eligible for Medicaid immediately. SSD recipients become eligible for Medicare after receiv¬ing benefits for 24 months. This is another reason to apply as soon as you think that you are disabled.

What is SSI?

SSI is another name for Supplemental Security Income. It can be applied for at the same time you apply for SSD benefits.

How Do You Qualify For SSI?

There are several requirements for SSI, most of which are the same requirement for SSD. The main difference is that you can only have a certain amount of income and assets in order to qualify for SSI.

How Do I Apply For SSI?

You apply for SSI in the same manner and usually at the same time that you apply for SSD benefits.

Does It Take As Long As SSD?

Yes.  The process is exactly the same.

Will I Still Need To Appeal The First Denial?

SSD and SSI cases take about three years, though we possibly can speed up the process.

Will I Have To Go To Court?

Yes.  Just like with SSD cases, you will have a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge. This is held in the same way as a SSD case.

How Long Does It Take To Receive Benefits?

Again, it is the same as SSD cases. They both take about 1 year from start to finish.

How Much Will I Receive?

Again, this is different in each case. However, it is normally less than what you would receive under SSD benefits.

Why Would I Want SSI Benefits?

If you have not paid enough money into Social Security for a long enough period to be considered “insured,” then SSI is the only route you can take to obtain benefits.

Can I Draw Both SSI and SSD?

Yes.  You can draw both, but only if the combined amounts, along with other income and/or assets is less than the amounts set by the Social Security Administration as the maximum amount allowed. Also, you would draw SSI benefits during the 5 month waiting period required before you can draw SSD benefits.

Can My Disabled Child Draw SSI?

Yes.  A child under the age of 18 can draw SSI benefits, but the same income and asset limitations apply.  The income of the whole family and all assets will be taken into consideration.

How Far Back Will I Be Paid?

With SSI benefits, you are only paid back to the date of your application for benefits. However, there is no 5 month waiting period as there is for SSD, so your benefits will begin from the date you applied.

Why Do I Need An Attorney For Either SSD or SSI Benefits?

You are not required to have an attorney to represent you in your quest for SSD or SSI benefits. However, without a lawyer, you will have to deal on your own directly with the Administrative Law Judge, the Vocational Specialist and the Social Security Administration. The best way to be sure that you receive a full and fair hearing and all the benefits to which you are entitled, is to have the help of an attorney who understands Social Security Regulations and Laws, and is interested in YOUR RIGHTS.

How Much Does An Attorney Charge?

You pay a legal fee ONLY if you are awarded benefits. Under the law set forth by Federal Statute, an attorney receives a 25% attorney fee on your past due benefits and upon review by the Social Security Administration.

Are There Any Other Charges For Preparing My Case?

There are times when your attorney must obtain medical records relating to your disability.  In some cases, your attorney may have to obtain a written report from a doc¬tor outlining the nature and severity of your disabling condition. Obviously, it is necessary to pay the doctors for this information. In addition, occasionally an attorney will incur other expenses in preparing your case.

How Are These Charges Paid?

Under the law, the client is responsible for the payment of these expenses. However, your attorney is allowed to pay your costs at the beginning of your claim and then request payment from you.

Where Can I Obtain Additional Information About Social Security Disability Or Supplemental Security Income Benefits?

Please call us for a free consultation.